Pupil Premium

Pupil premium strategy statement - 2017/18

1.    Summary information

School

Queensbury Academy

Academic Year

2017/18

Total PP budget

£145,860

Date of most recent PP Review

09/17

Total number of pupils

1034

Number of pupils eligible for PP

148

Date for next internal review of this strategy

02/17

2.  Current attainment

 

Pupils eligible for PP

Pupils not eligible for PP

(national average)

% achieving 5A* - C(4-9) incl. EM (2016-17 only)

21.1% (24.5%)

38.2% (49.4%)

% achieving expected progress in English / Maths (2016-17 only)

47.4% (44.3%)

60.3% (71.2%)

Progress 8 score average

-0.942 (-0.40)

0.363 (0.11)

Attainment 8 score average

35.0 (37.0)

45.89 (49.8)

3Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP)

In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor literacy skills)

A.  

Pupil Premium progress is below national average

B.  

Behaviour for learning needs to improve for identified PP students

C.  

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

D.

Attendance of PP students is below expectations and impacting on progress

E.

Students enter the Academy mid-year, many of whom have complex needs

 

4Desired outcomes

(desired outcomes and how they will be measured)

Success criteria

A.  

Improved progress of PP students at both KS3 & 4

Pupils eligible for PP make more progress by the end of the year than ‘other’ pupils so that at least 50% exceed progress targets and 100% meet expected targets. Other pupils still make at least the expected progress. This will be evidenced using Data assessment points and Department/ Academy analysis

 

B.  

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

Pupils eligible for PP make as much progress as ‘other’ pupils identified as high attaining, across Key Stage 3, so that 85% or above are on track for 4 levels of progress by the end of KS4. Where they are not, departments are putting in place wave 1 interventions, monitored by heads of departments (HOD) and senior team.

 

C.  

Improved behaviour for identified PP students

Fewer behaviour incidents recorded for these pupils on the school system (without changing recording practices or standards).

 

D.  

Increased attendance of PP students

Reduce the number of persistent absentees (PA) among pupils eligible for PP to 10% or below.  Overall attendance among pupils eligible for PP improves from 92.14% to 95% in line with ‘other’ pupils.

 

 

5.  Planned expenditure

·         Academic year

2017/18

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the Pupil Premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

    i.   Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Improved Progress of PP students at KS3&4

Improve the HODs use of data and how they engage their staff with it to improve outcomes

All staff will be able to identify barriers to progress and cater their provision in line with the needs of the students. Disadvantaged students will be prioritised to support their learning.

Continue with Self review report after each assessment point modelled on best practice.

Develop the use of ‘context sheets’ to support teacher/class level data analysis tool to improve accountability and insight

Integrate CPD opportunities for staff at all levels to improve their understanding of how to use data analysis tools

 

JM

API, AP2, AP3.

Improved Progress of PP students at KS3&4

Create a more tailored target setting process which uses national (FFT) benchmarks but which is moderated by staff.

The disparity between target grades and actual results indicates previous target setting regime was unhelpful. Via collaboration within the trust to create aspirational but realistic targets for all year groups.

Moderated targets to be negotiated with HODs and checked to ensure that PP students grades are moderated in line with student needs.

JM

AP1, AP2, AP3.

Improved Progress of PP students at KS3&4

Improve the quality of action planning for raising achievement across both Key stages

To build on the success of PIXL strategies used with Year 11 to support vulnerable students in KS3/4.

CPD and sharing good practice opportunities through the CPD menu and through learning walks/book scrutiny. Use of Context sheets to support/monitor actions and impact.

JM

AP2, AP3.

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

Diagnosis, Therapy, Testing approach to tracking progress and planning in class interventions with the use of PLCs and Smith Proformas

A number of schools in the trust are finding this is having an impact e.g. St Marks are significantly positive P8 score

EEF toolkit   - impact is 8+ years

HODs meetings

CPD and sharing good practice opportunities through the CPD menu and through learning walks/book scrutiny

MAL

Through raising standards meetings (four in the year)

 

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

Maths and Science tutor groups

The students in the Maths tutor group last year made on average very good progress by hitting their targets.

Meet with LW/AB/EF and SP to plan which students and how to plan the sessions they are focussed

AB and SP

Learning Walk - fortnightly

Students voice – once a month

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

GCSE Pod

From case studies at other schools where GCSE pod help develop home learning habits. Usage was tracked and related to PP student progress.

Fortnightly session for PP students in IT room to use GCSE pod. Usage tracked fortnightly and those with good usage are rewarded. Parents are informed of it. Staff are trained on it so they can make links from it to their DTT approach.

MAL

Fortnightly and then at the end of the year through student voice and through data (exam results and usage)

Total budgeted cost

£50,000

  ii.   Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Improved Progress of PP students

Literacy and Numeracy withdrawal intervention

 

 

 

Numeracy and Literacy interventions tackle issues through small group work in KS3 and KS4 with additional 1:1 in KS4 where appropriate.

Track pupils and quickly intervene with key staff

Effective marking and feedback

 

Some students need additional 1:1 or small group intervention to make expected progress

Staff timetables and time given for analysing student progress and identifying students to attend.

Entry and exit criteria determined and tracked

 

Data reviews show progress of students receiving interventions

RCM/ JM/ SENCo

July 17

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

Departmental p6

 

 

Small group additional learning time for students not making expected progress.  Can address specific gaps in learning to improve the skills necessary for success. Also helps build positive relationships between staff and PP students

Staff asked to identify PP students to attend

P6 sessions to be added to timetables

Holiday school invites to be sent to parents with reply slips

MAL/ HODs

Termly

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

Academic mentoring – each PP student has a mentor who tracks their progress, motivation and organisation.

The focus will be on developing metacognition, self-regulation and improving home learning habits which al score highly on the EEF toolkit.

Regular mentor bulletin – once a fortnight. Updating the mentor lists each assessment point. Mentors to meet parents at parents evening. Feedback progress once a fortnight

MAL/HOHs

Termly

Progress accelerated for underachieving Year 11 PP students

Extra ICT course offered through Petxi

To improve the bucket 3 score for students who have a low score or have an empty slot. This can be done in 7 days and so will have limited impact on their other subjects.

Work with HODs and look at student data to ensure the correct students are on the correct course. Monitor carefully the attendance and motivation over the 7 days

MAL

Immediately after the programme is finished and then after the summer results

Targeted parent evening/meetings

Parent evening/meetings  post January mocks – academic review meeting format

EEF – 3+ years

Monitor the attendance of the parents and the quality of the targets/actions arising from the meeting

MAL

After the meeting

Total budgeted cost

£61,00

 iii.   Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Improved behaviour for identified PP Students

High quality SEMH and Safeguarding support addresses issues and improves behaviour

Many students have SEMH and home issues that are affecting concentration and progression school, until these are supported effectively, achievement and attainment are likely to be reduced

Time given for Safeguarding staff to attend and initiate multi-agency meetings

Referrals to outside agencies for support monitored for quality and impact

TAC/ CIN/ CP/ Parent meetings will review impact

HLTA behaviour to work with identified students

RCM

At appropriate points with each student – PSP/ EHCP reviews and parental/ TAC/ CIN meetings

 

Improved behaviour of identified PP students

Personalised behaviour management strategies and mentoring of those students

whose behaviour is impacting on their and others progress by senior staff

 

Teachers of PP students with challenging behaviours to be offered support by in-school Pivotal lead in developing a wider range of strategies to manage behaviour.

 

Behaviour of identified PP students to be discussed fortnightly by all pastoral staff, SENCO and Safeguarding team to agree, monitor and amend the most effective strategies and provision for their behaviours as they develop or change.

 

Introduction of new KS4 reward system to promote engagement and behaviour for learning

 

EEF suggests personalised and targeted interventions with older students can be effective

 

Student achievement benefits from a positive relationship with staff they see as supporting them

 

 

Time for regular sessions

Target setting

Review of progress with student and parents

Behaviour analysed and monitored for improvement

Review of Academy Reward and sanctions policy

SR

Termly

Increased attendance of PP students

Whole school push on attendance

Attendance consultant to monitor attendance and follow up on those at risk of PA

 

All tutors to monitor the attendance of their PP students weekly to challenge and praise, reporting back to HoH.

 

Attendance consultant and HoH to run an attendance sweep with PP students whose attendance is under target.

 

Attendance consultant and HoH to target parental meetings for PP families where attendance is below target to provide support and challenge.

Students cannot achieve if they do not attend school regularly. Evidence shows time in school directly correlates to improved academic outcomes

Students in school are known to be safe and able to access appropriate interventions to support them

 

 

VP in charge of attendance and working with Attendance consultant and Admin who completes daily calls for absence

Variety of strategies used to support poor attendance including working with outside agencies and FPNs

Challenge via tutors, attendance letters, phone calls and home visits as necessary

Attendance figures published weekly and broken done by student group

SR

Weekly

Total budgeted cost

£35,000

             

 

6.  Review of expenditure

Previous Academic Year

 

    i.   Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

  ii.   Targeted support

Improved progress of PP students

Year 11 small group and 1:1 intervention

Interventions were staffed and students felt useful. Criteria was met for some students but attainment was still below national average for this group as a whole

 

This approach will be continued as student voice survey shows students find it valuable. Staff to become more rigorous with aims of the intervention and ability to show progress or gap closed as a result.

The use of high quality alternative provision will continue for specific Year 11 students who may not gain qualifications at the Academy

 

£35,000

Improved progress of PP students

Additional support for students not making expected progress at KS3

Difficulty with recruiting staff mean additional support was hard to staff and therefore affected impact.

 

KS3 PP students however are making better progress than previous years

Data analysis and identification of students needs to be rigorous catch students quickly if they are not making expected progress

Intervention needs to be of high quality and measure outcomes.  Monitoring of these interventions needs to be earlier, more rigorous and able to show impact

 

 

 

 

£20,000

 iii.   Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

 

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

Decrease number of students at risk of NEET

Independent Careers Advice and Information Guidance commissioned

Success criteria was met and this resource was available for non PP students also

 

99% of Year 11 students in education, employment or training September 2017

This will be continued as students found 1:1 interviews helpful and NEET student numbers decreased.

Future input will be more targeted and start earlier with PP students. Group sessions will also be delivered to younger students. A&T work will support this also for more-able PP students

 

£5000

Improved attendance, attainment and progress of PP students with SEMH needs

HLTA to work 1:1 and in small groups with students

 

Students that received 1:1/ small group support saw improved outcomes, although not always academic ones. Attendance still remained an issue for some students despite intensive work to support them as evidenced by recent Ofsted judgement. All Year 11 vulnerable students on personalised curriculums were in education or training September 2017

This will continue but need to consider how to recruit high quality staff with a therapeutic background and experience of working in a school with young adults.

Consider use of PP money to commission work from CAMHS and suitable charities if necessary

 

£19,000

Improved attendance, attainment and progress of PP students with SEMH needs

Attendance officer to work with PAs

 

Student Support and Safeguarding staff input with disadvantaged and vulnerable students

A variety of strategies were used that improved attendance in many cases.  However, for students with significant SEMH and home issues the impact was limited

 

PP attendance for  2016-17 was 92.154% which was below target and expectations

This work will continue and become PP priority for 2016/17.  More work need to be done with outside agencies, especially CAMHS and Social Care to support vulnerable students and prioritise the importance of school attendance.

Areas to address for further improvement include lateness to school and the use of FTEs.

 

 

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